Micro Usb To Usb Pinout Assignment

Author’s Note! This article has been imported from my previous website. I wanted to preserve all of the old content as many people have found some value in it. There may be some broken links and or formating issues. If something isn’t right, please let me know and I’ll do my best to make an update.

You would think that when a great company sells a micro USB plug, they would publish a very clear, concise guide on how to wire it up. Well, they don’t, and I had to dig around all over the Internet to find enough information to clear things up. So now, you don’t have to.

Here is the connector in question:

Here are the associated pins coming out of the actual plug:

Now, here is the information from Wikipedia that ties all of these things together (in one place!)

PinNameWire colorDescription
1VBUSRed+5 V
2D−WhiteData−
3D+GreenData+
4IDN/APermits detection of which end of a cable is plugged in, “A” connector (host): connected to the signal ground, “B” connector (device): not connected
5GNDBlackSignal ground

If you were wanting to wire together a simple micro USB power cable (say for a Raspberry Pi or something), all you would need to do is:

  • Run 5V to Pin 1
  • Run Ground to Pin 5

It can’t get more clear than this:

I hope this helps you, because it’s ridiculous that this article is not immediately below the product on every site that sells these.

Update: EDAC 690-W05-260-044 Pin Out

A thoughtful reader of this article, Mihir, was kind enough to provide a pin out description for the EDAC 690-W05-260-044 USB Connector, here it is:

Connector rear pins:

Connector pin mapping:

Drop me a line if you have any questions or comments! Thanks for reading!

USB Connector Pinouts

USB is a serial bus. It uses 4 shielded wires: two for power (+5v & GND) and two for differential data signals (labelled as D+ and D- in pinout).
In a USB data cable Data+ and Data- signals are transmitted on a twisted pair with no termination needed. Half-duplex differential signalling is used to reduce the effects of electromagnetic noise on longer lines. D+ and D- operate together; they are not separate simplex connections.

USB supports four data rates:

  • Low Speed (1.5 Mbit per second) that is mostly used for Human Input Devices (HID) such as keyboards, mice, joysticks and often the buttons on higher speed devices such as printers or scanners;
  • Full Speed (12 Mbit per second) which is widely supported by USB hubs.
  • Hi-Speed (480 Mbit per second) was added in USB 2.0 specification. Not all USB 2.0 devices are Hi-Speed.
  • SuperSpeed (USB 3.0) rate of 4800 Mbit/s (~572 MB/s).

A USB device must indicate its speed by pulling either the D+ or D- line high to 3.3 volts. These pull up resistors at the device end will also be used by the host or hub to detect the presence of a device connected to its port. Without a pull up resistor, USB assumes there is nothing connected to the bus.

Pinout for the various connectors are shown below

Pin Name Cable color Description
1 VCC Red +5 VDC
2 D- White Data -
3 D+ Green Data +
4 GND Black Ground

 

USB Micro-B Connector

The Micro-B connector is becomming more and more popular on small devices. Here is the pinout shown from the end of the plug

Pin Name Cable color Description
1 VCC Red +5 VDC
2 D- White Data -
3 D+ Green Data +
4 ID n/a USB OTG ID
5 GND Black Ground

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